The best camera is the one you have.

Updated on December 28, 2017 in Equipment
6 on October 23, 2017

I am a beginner in photography. Recently, I had a talk with a professional landscape photographer and he told me what I have written as a topic. He further mentioned: It is better to have a camera then none. 

When I check my pictures taken so far, I realize that when zooming in, the quality of pixels are pretty bad. 

I would like to invest in a camera which gives me a higher resolution then my Cannon EOS 1100D. 

But I have to mention, that I am not at all a master of my todays camera yet, and that there is a long way to go. Does it make sense to get a better skill first and then buy a better one? 

Nearby my working place, there is a very good store for Cameras, where you can rent out every new model. Would you recommend me to rent out some to figure out which ones I can work with best?

Thank you for your opinion!

 
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1 on November 6, 2017

Your camera is perfectly adequate. Master your tool, master your skills. Master your understanding of light. Master your understanding of composition. Some of my favourite images come from my cellphone and my elderly, can barely hold a charge on the battery Panasonic LX-2. 

Set up the camera to the save with the least compression or RAW, best of all, both. Memory cards are cheap. Page 74 of the manual (at least the one I found online tells you how) Set it to RAW + L

To master your tool, study the manual and try the different settings. The old Leica manuals used to strongly advise that you be familiar enough with the camera to load it in the dark. No mean feat to be sure.

Here’s an interesting exercise that Bernie Bloom once gave us in a composition class:

Pick a focal length, say 50mm. Pick a subject 100 yards (in the old money) away. Now, take make three images: 1 at ground level, 1 at waist level and one at eye level. Take 5 steps. Do it again. Rinse, repeat. 

Study how the composition changes as you change your perspective. Try it with different focal lengths. You’ll find that sometimes good old sneaker zoom works just fine. 

Take the time to understand this maxim: “Camera light meters are pathological liars”.  It’s in their nature. To them, their prime directive is:  “Everything must be middle grey”. I have yet to find a light meter, handheld, spot, center weighted, matrix that sees a scene like my aging MK I eyeball. 

Learn how to make the best compromise for exposure, especially in difficult light. When in doubt, Sunny 16 it (f16 @1/ISO in bright sun) and all the derivatives of that. Play a game with yourself as you walk around trying to guess the your exposure settings would be. To check your self, take an exposure reading of grass. It’s on middle reflectivity and should confirm your guess. 

Experiment with different exposure settings for a given ISO. Understand what you are seeing and why.

 

on November 13, 2017

Dear TomServoCA, thanx a lot for your interesting advice! After the workshop with Eric in Berlin, I will be happy to combine what I have learnt there with your ideas! You made me more hungry trying out my camera!

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0 on November 16, 2017

I agree with Tom, above, about working your equipment to death to get the most from it. My most advanced camera is an iPhone SE (a 6s-class camera and processor). My favorite subject is a detailed landscape, usually one with lots of tree leaves and branches. Getting a technically good result makes for some forethought—tripod, clean lens, appreciation of light, appreciation of technical range of the iPhone, etc., not to mention targeted post-processing.

Beside that lies the challenge of making whatever the iPhone can capture more dramatic, more interesting, more compositionally appealing and so forth.

So while working to get the most from my simple equipment, I have as much of a job to do with getting the most from the inherent art of the scene. And the latter seems the harder part.

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0 on November 16, 2017

Instead to adquire a new camera is better to master your abilities first: investing money in workshops, reading a lot about photography, studying the work of the masters, watching films and get inspired with other arts like music or painting. 

I have a EOS 1100 too, and I can get very nice photos. You only need to know more about how use yor gear and shooting a lot.

The most important thing about this:  Be better day after day and trust more in yourself.

Cheers!

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0 on December 11, 2017

Hii

I have Nikon D850 DSLR | Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS | Resolution: 45.4MP | Lens: Nikon F mount | Viewfinder: Optical | Screen type: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert

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0 on December 28, 2017

For street photography you need a fast focusing camera like the Sony A6000 and this camera also has 11 photos per second capability which in street photography you will need, it’s almost impossible to get that good photo of somebody moving with just one photo, you have to take a series of photos, plus it’s small and easy to carry, it has 24 mp sensor if you are interested in mp. And it’s not expensive, i used to have a Nikon D5300 but then tried the A6000 and gave up the Nikon just because of it’s fast focusing and size.
Great little camera, i now have the A6500 which is almost the same but i can take more photos without the buffer filling, in the A6000 the buffer fills after about 26 photos and then you have to wait for the camera to process the photos, but it’s very rare that you take 26 photos in one burst i usually take about 12 in one burst.
But the A6500 can take a lot more, about 200 before the buffer fills but the camera is a bit more expensive.
If you can rent a camera that’s the best way to go to check which camera you like, but check the Sony A6000

http://juanortegaphotography.com

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