Photo Reflection and Critique

Updated on August 30, 2017 in Photography
7 on August 28, 2017

I was inspired by this “Intimate interview with Eric Kim” by Arek on photography, life, and philosophy and thought about doing something fun and experimental here. 

  1. Post a photo that you took for critique that reveals something about you–it could be something personal or something that sparks emotion.
  2. Pose a question about photography or philosophy for the next person.
  3. Each person who posts a photo must leave a photo critique on at least 3 photos and answer the previous question.

I will go first:

Photo:

Question: How does photography influence the way you remember? Are there things you did/ did not photograph that you remember more powerfully?

 
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2 on August 30, 2017

Question: Do you use post-processing for its own effect, or do you use it as minimally as possible to preserve the “original” image? Is a lens’s focal length, an in-camera effect like slow shutter speed or bokeh, or shooting in black-and-white “processing” in the same way that photo editing software is?

on August 30, 2017

@RyanPSt I like the feel of this photo and the round colored lights contrasted with the brambly branches scattered throughout the frame. I think this would work stronger together as a series with other photos if you were telling a story woven together by color, lights, or nature/trees.

To your question about post-processing, I do not believe in the ‘descriptive’ or ‘objective’ image. For me, post-processing is just part of the tools to convey emotion and story. If the ‘tool’ is in camera or post, it doesn’t matter as long as the image, feeling, and story is strong.

 

on August 30, 2017

Ryan, I like the feeling of nostalgia in your shot  the green and reds look like apples  yet I want something else in the frame to bite into  and for me, I prefer looking at the original image, because I hate seeing one thing in the viewfinder, and seeing another on my laptop  

 

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2 on August 30, 2017

To answer Cindy,

photography often falsifies what I once “remembered”. It shows my memory is faulty… yet, isn’t my subjective memory more important than the picture, which is more “factual”?

my question, “Is a portrait of a person more about you, or them?”

 

on August 30, 2017

 

To answer Eric,

A portrait it’s about both the subject and the photographer. I have a lot of street portraits and in everyone I stayed with part of their soul impregnated with my feelings at the moment of taking the photo.

on August 30, 2017

Luis: Great moment captured, of a unique character. Nice job.

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0 on August 30, 2017

Nice one Cindy. Love the overexposed hands, wich reflect an intense and pure personal reletionship. Eric’s face confirms it

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