Killing your babies, advice needed.

Updated on May 26, 2017 in Photography
20 on May 25, 2017

So, I’m just starting my journey in street photography. I’m an amateur at best (www.flickr.com/photos/connorlw) and so I have a hard time ditching photos that are mediocre. I am torn because on the one hand I feel like keeping the photos would keep my spirits high about improving and give me something tangible that I can have as evidence of my effort. On the other hand, I don’t want to become complacent with my composition or produce anything less than great.

What are your thoughts? As a beginner should you kill more of your photos, or keep more of them? Why?

 
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1 on May 25, 2017

My advice would be to keep the images that spark an emotion when you look at it. Maybe a memory of the encounter. If you keep mediocre photos just for the sake of keeping them you will end up with a ton of images in your collection that you are not too fond of. 

on May 25, 2017

Thank you that helps a lot!

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1 on May 25, 2017

You can keep as many of them as you want, but I think you could benefit from being more conservative about the pictures you show to the general public. There’s a couple of pictures in your feed I enjoyed looking at, possibly more, but because the quality and theme varied to quite a large degree I soon got tired and went and looked at some other site instead. 

When choosing a photo to share with the public, ask yourself these questions:

Why did I take this picture? 

What does this picture convey to somebody who weren’t there? 

Does this picture rhyme with the other pictures I’ve taken lately?

Good luck!

on May 25, 2017

This helps so much thank you!!

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1 on May 25, 2017

Keep the photos that you really like, following your soul and guts. Of course, discard those photos that you feel weak and boring and that no represent your vision, it probably be the same for others.

Look for external advice for friends, loved ones and other photographers.

on May 25, 2017

Hmm I will definitely ask my friends for their opinion more!

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1 on May 25, 2017

my flickr is a mess i use it more like a giant moodboard and hosting service. you can keep there if you want, but if you want to present your work as serious on a platform i advise you to shoot more and post often but then delete what you are unhappy of. if you do delete your photos they still live in your lightroom 🙂

on May 25, 2017

True!

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0 on May 25, 2017

you can also make photos private on flickr, and are still available to you if you choose the view all option

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1 on May 25, 2017

If you have storage available where it doesn’t interfere, like an f drive, i would keep every shot you take. Not only for reference but your opinion and how things change could make them very good some day.

on May 25, 2017

Interesting. I’m a poor college student sadly. I wish I had the space to keep every shot!

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3 on May 26, 2017

It depends on how you want to use those photos. In any case, remember that a photo is a phrase. You can’t tell a story with just one phrase, you need at least three of them to tell a story with a beginning, a middle and an end. As Bruce Gilden says in a famous interview video on YouTube “it’s the body of work of an artist that counts, not a single shot. Everyone can get a nice and clean single shot”.

So the question here is how do you want to use those photos?

For example, do you want to build a portfolio for customers? Buy a domain (yourname.com) and post there very few shots (no more than 3) of what styles you are capable to do (fashion, landscapes, street). But the photos must be your bests.

So, what do you want to do with your photos?

on May 26, 2017

Good point! I definitely want it to be a personal documentation/journal rather than a commercial venture.

on May 26, 2017

Free blog sites are perfect for this. It doesn’t cost anything and it gives you something that you can continue to reflect back on. 

on May 26, 2017

I think Instagram is the right place for you then. I suggest you to make a rule (like three posts per week, or even one), in order to stimulate your creativity. Don’t make a photo with the cell phone and post it straight away. Instead, take as many photos you can during a week and take one day to analyze them and post just the bests. You’ll see that you’ll become more detached from them and you’ll improve a lot.

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0 on May 26, 2017

Keep the pics, but don’t necessarily publish them in forums.

Going back and looking at old pics has two cons: 1. You can find things in old pics that you didn’t see before and edit them in other ways. 2. You learn and this is a great way to see how you’re getting better. 

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3 on May 26, 2017

And also, if I may share, there is a way to look at your own pics called Cognitive friction. Here’s how that works…
https://gfnstreet.wordpress.com/11-hur-vet-jag-om-min-bild-ar-bra/

on May 26, 2017

@GFN, thats a great link, I found it useful. Thanks for sharing 🙂

on May 26, 2017

Thank you!

on May 26, 2017

Great write up!

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